Fandom

X-Files Wiki

Star Trek

5,068pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Comments0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

Star Trek on Lightwriter

A message about Star Trek is displayed by John Doggett on a Lightwriter machine in 2001.

Star Trek is a franchise of several science fiction television series, and feature length films.

In 1982, young Ringo Langly was under the impression that in the year 2000, everyone would be eating food pills, like on Star Trek. (TLG: "Like Water for Octane")

FBI Agent Dana Scully once remarked that most people with encyclopedic knowledge on extraterrestrial life, actually gain that knowledge from watching too many reruns of Star Trek. (TXF: "Dreamland")

Assistant Director Walter Skinner told Wayne Federman that Fox Mulder investigated cases in a "Star Trekky" way, which is part of the reason why he used Mulder's likeness for his movie. (TXF: "Hollywood A.D.")

In 2001, FBI Agent John Doggett thought that Agent Monica Reyes' idea of parallel universes was influenced by watching too much Star Trek. (TXF: "4-D")

AllusionsEdit

There have also been several references which alude to Star Trek, without mentioning it by name.

In TXF: "Fearful Symmetry", Melvin Frohike utters the phrase "Beam me up, Scotty", which was popularized in Star Trek fandom.

In TXF: "Dreamland" and "Dreamland II," there are two more implied references to Star Trek. In part I, Jeff Smoodge mentions the phrase "Beam me up, Scotty". In part II, a home movie reel is shown, with a young Fox Mulder dressed as Mr. Spock, a popular character from Star Trek.

In the comic story "Generations", the Lone Gunmen refer to Captains Kirk & Picard, and Seven of Nine, characters from various Star Trek series.

In the first X-files time travel episode Mulder and Scully show a composite sketch to Lisa Ianelli that bears an uncanny resemblance to Captain Picard instead of the villain. Several minutes later a victims flight number is shown as Pan Oceanic Flight # 1701. (TXF: "Synchrony")

Background InformationEdit

The scene in "Jump the Shark" in which the Lone Gunmen die pays homage to a scene in the movie Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. In that film, the character of Spock saves the U.S.S. Enterprise, but has to sacrifice himself by being sealed in a radiation chamber to do so. Before his eventual death however, he is able to talk to his commanding officer and friend, Captain Kirk, through a wall of glass. The Gunmen make a similar sacrifice, by sealing themselves in with an airborne virus in an airtight fire door. They are also able to speak with Jimmy Bond and Yves Adele Harlow through a pane of glass shortly before they die.

In the DVD audio commentary for "Je Souhaite", Vince Gilligan recalls that, in his original concept for that episode's story of someone finding an android in a long-locked-up self-storage locker, he had thought the idea of incorporating an android seemed more to him like Star Trek than The X-Files.

Rob Bowman directed episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation, prior to his work on The X-Files, The X-Files Movie, and The Lone Gunmen's pilot episode.

External linksEdit

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki